Charles Gentry


WASHINGTON STATE, USA

Like many, “Chuck” first experienced fishing at a very young age. Although he was not immediately taken with the sport. He found that sitting around waiting for a bobber to be pulled down to be a bit dull. When he was 10, this all changed upon watching an older cousin fly fishing for trout. Chuck can’t say why, but he was immediately interested by almost every aspect of the sport. Actually, Chuck learned how to tie flies, before he learned to fly fish. That was forty years ago, and fly fishing has been a constant his life.

Initially, Chuck targeted the trout and bass which inhabited the rivers and lakes near his home in Colorado. Early on he became aware of fly fishing for anadromous fish through fly fishing books and magazine articles. Over twenty-five years ago, while attending university, Chuck and some of his friends made a trip to Oregon to fish for Steelhead. Since that trip, anadromous fish have been the main focus of his angling attentions. For eleven years, Chuck has had the good fortune to live in British Columbia near the banks of the Skeena river. Presently, he resides in Washington State, where he’s just a couple hours away from some of the best Steelhead rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Beside steelhead, Chuck has traveled throughout North America and Northern Europe chasing Atlantic salmon, Chinook salmon and sea run brown trout.

Along the way, he has spent a great deal of time thinking about flies and fly design. Mikael and Chuck share the belief that presentation is of the upmost importance, but they also share the belief that if one is achieving maximum effectiveness, other factors such as tackle, fly line choice, and a well designed fly must be taken into account. A well designed fly must suit the prevailing conditions. Colour, size, shape and profile can make a difference. Obviously, the fly must appeal to the fish, but it must also appeal to and inspire confidence in the angler. Consistent angling success is most often achieved when knowledge, skill, persistence, and preparation meets opportunity.
— Blending knowledge of past with his own experience and observations, Mikael has truly been an innovator in fly fishing techniques and fly design, Chuck says.

Chuck & Mikael, Kharlovka, Russia

Charles Gentry


WASHINGTON STATE, USA

Like many, “Chuck” first experienced fishing at a very young age. Although he was not immediately taken with the sport. He found that sitting around waiting for a bobber to be pulled down to be a bit dull. When he was 10, this all changed upon watching an older cousin fly fishing for trout. Chuck can’t say why, but he was immediately interested by almost every aspect of the sport. Actually, Chuck learned how to tie flies, before he learned to fly fish. That was forty years ago, and fly fishing has been a constant his life.

Initially, Chuck targeted the trout and bass which inhabited the rivers and lakes near his home in Colorado. Early on he became aware of fly fishing for anadromous fish through fly fishing books and magazine articles. Over twenty-five years ago, while attending university, Chuck and some of his friends made a trip to Oregon to fish for Steelhead. Since that trip, anadromous fish have been the main focus of his angling attentions. For eleven years, Chuck has had the good fortune to live in British Columbia near the banks of the Skeena river. Presently, he resides in Washington State, where he’s just a couple hours away from some of the best Steelhead rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Beside steelhead, Chuck has traveled throughout North America and Northern Europe chasing Atlantic salmon, Chinook salmon and sea run brown trout.

Along the way, he has spent a great deal of time thinking about flies and fly design. Mikael and Chuck share the belief that presentation is of the upmost importance, but they also share the belief that if one is achieving maximum effectiveness, other factors such as tackle, fly line choice, and a well designed fly must be taken into account. A well designed fly must suit the prevailing conditions. Colour, size, shape and profile can make a difference. Obviously, the fly must appeal to the fish, but it must also appeal to and inspire confidence in the angler. Consistent angling success is most often achieved when knowledge, skill, persistence, and preparation meets opportunity.
— Blending knowledge of past with his own experience and observations, Mikael has truly been an innovator in fly fishing techniques and fly design, Chuck says.

Chuck & Mikael, Kharlovka, Russia

Charles Gentry


WASHINGTON STATE, USA

Like many, “Chuck” first experienced fishing at a very young age. Although he was not immediately taken with the sport. He found that sitting around waiting for a bobber to be pulled down to be a bit dull. When he was 10, this all changed upon watching an older cousin fly fishing for trout. Chuck can’t say why, but he was immediately interested by almost every aspect of the sport. Actually, Chuck learned how to tie flies, before he learned to fly fish. That was forty years ago, and fly fishing has been a constant his life.

Initially, Chuck targeted the trout and bass which inhabited the rivers and lakes near his home in Colorado. Early on he became aware of fly fishing for anadromous fish through fly fishing books and magazine articles. Over twenty-five years ago, while attending university, Chuck and some of his friends made a trip to Oregon to fish for Steelhead. Since that trip, anadromous fish have been the main focus of his angling attentions. For eleven years, Chuck has had the good fortune to live in British Columbia near the banks of the Skeena river. Presently, he resides in Washington State, where he’s just a couple hours away from some of the best Steelhead rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Beside steelhead, Chuck has traveled throughout North America and Northern Europe chasing Atlantic salmon, Chinook salmon and sea run brown trout.

Along the way, he has spent a great deal of time thinking about flies and fly design. Mikael and Chuck share the belief that presentation is of the upmost importance, but they also share the belief that if one is achieving maximum effectiveness, other factors such as tackle, fly line choice, and a well designed fly must be taken into account. A well designed fly must suit the prevailing conditions. Colour, size, shape and profile can make a difference. Obviously, the fly must appeal to the fish, but it must also appeal to and inspire confidence in the angler. Consistent angling success is most often achieved when knowledge, skill, persistence, and preparation meets opportunity.
— Blending knowledge of past with his own experience and observations, Mikael has truly been an innovator in fly fishing techniques and fly design, Chuck says.

Chuck & Mikael, Kharlovka, Russia